Abandoned Southeast / mediadrumimage.com

By Mark McConville

 

PEEK inside the abandoned ‘Devil’s School’ rumoured to have killer principals, missing kids, and even a cannibalistic janitor that tortured kids in the boiler room.

Abandoned Southeast / mediadrumimage.com

 

Eerie images show the heavily-graffitied remains of the toilets, corridors and atriums that now lie empty.

Abandoned Southeast / mediadrumimage.com

 

Other spooky shots show the impressive entrance with ‘Public School Number Four’ inscribed above it, views from the windows looking out to the nearby motorway and areas that were once indoors now open to the elements.

Abandoned Southeast / mediadrumimage.com

 

The striking snaps were taken at Riverside Grammar School in Jacksonville, Florida, USA by an urban explorer known as Abandoned Southeast.

Abandoned Southeast / mediadrumimage.com

 

“During the late 1950s, I-10 and I-95 interstate construction isolated the school leading it to close in 1960,” he said.

Abandoned Southeast / mediadrumimage.com

 

“The building was used for office storage until it was condemned in 1971. There are rumours the school was rented as a Catholic school for a few years in the late 1960s before it was abandoned.

Abandoned Southeast / mediadrumimage.com

 

“Stories of hauntings and satanic worship began in the 1960s. There were also rumours of killer principals, missing kids, and even a cannibalistic janitor that tortured kids in the boiler room. All of which were highly untrue.

Abandoned Southeast / mediadrumimage.com

 

“Police reports indicate a rape occurred shortly after the building was condemned, along with various other accounts of trespassing and vandalism. Sadly, there is even a classroom labelled the “rape room” by taggers. Easy to see why the school gained the nickname, “The Devil’s School.”

Abandoned Southeast / mediadrumimage.com

 

Public School Number Four was constructed on the former Riverside Park School site. The original wood-framed school house had multiple additions since being built in 1891. It was eventually considered unsafe and closed after being deemed a fire hazard.

Abandoned Southeast / mediadrumimage.com

 

In 1915, Duval County voters passed legislation to build a dozen new brick school houses. Public School Number Four was completed in 1918 at a cost of $250,000. At the time, the school had a beautiful view of Riverside Park.

Abandoned Southeast / mediadrumimage.com

 

Public School Number Four was designed by architect Rutledge Holmes and built by Florida Engineering and Construction Company. The entire two-story building is solid concrete making it virtually fireproof.

Abandoned Southeast / mediadrumimage.com

 

The Neo-Classical design features massive columns prominently placed at the front and side entrances. Classrooms were located upstairs with the library, auditorium, and administration offices on the first floor. The school house featured large windows and high ceilings with a fireplace in the cafeteria.

Abandoned Southeast / mediadrumimage.com

 

The “Public School Number Four” inscription refers to the school being Duval County’s fourth public school house. The school was known as Riverside Grammar School until 1950, then renamed Annie Lytle Elementary School after former principal and teacher, Annie Lytle Housh.

Abandoned Southeast / mediadrumimage.com

 

“In 1999, Foundation Holding Inc. purchased the property and planned to demolish the school building,” added Abandoned Southeast.

Abandoned Southeast / mediadrumimage.com

 

“In its place would be a retirement facility named Lytle House Condominiums. Some of the units were sold before construction even began. After public outrage and pressure from multiple historic groups, the City of Jacksonville designated the school a historic landmark in 2000, halting plans for demolition indefinitely.

Abandoned Southeast / mediadrumimage.com

 

“In 2005, The Annie Lytle Preservation Group was created by a group of neighborhood volunteers aiming to preserve and clean up Public School Number Four. They hoped it would make it more marketable to a buyer who would renovate the 98-year old school.

Abandoned Southeast / mediadrumimage.com

 

“The preservation group has removed tons of debris and dead trees from the school property, enhancing the appearance. Another fire in the auditorium broke out in 2012, collapsing the partial roof that was left. The school also suffered fires on the first floor administration offices set by transients.

Abandoned Southeast / mediadrumimage.com

 

“Today, a barbed-wire fence standing six feet tall surrounds the entire property. The preservation group actively patrols the grounds and reports anyone trespassing to law enforcement.”

 

For more information see www.abandonedsoutheast.com

 

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