Mediadrumimages / David Canales

By Mark McConville

 

STUNNING pictures have captured an intrepid traveller cycling across frozen rivers and lakes to make his way through a huge glacier.

 

The incredible images show cycling across the frozen ground as the blue wall of ice rises high around him.

Mediadrumimages / David Canales

 

Other striking shots show the adventurer resting and looking out towards the exit where natural light streams in to light the glacial cave.

 

The remarkable photographs were taken at Knik and Spencer Glacier, Alaska, USA by amateur photographer David Canales (33), from Kingsville, Texas but now living in Anchorage, Alaska.

Mediadrumimages / David Canales

 

“Living in the beautiful state of Alaska, on a weekly basis I get to see some beautiful things,” he said.

 

“When the rivers and lakes freeze up, I’m able to access these glaciers easily on a bike. I wouldn’t be able to do a trip like this in the summer.

Mediadrumimages / David Canales

 

“Being able to ride along, sometimes inside and on top of the glacier is such a surreal experience. It makes you feel tiny; these glaciers go as far as the eye can see. Photos don’t do justice to how big everything is.

 

“When you have people in your photos it helps bring things to scale. I make sure my friends are wearing colours that will separate themselves from the background.

Mediadrumimages / David Canales

 

“For example, glaciers are blue and I make sure my friends avoid wearing blue colours. In the photos you see here, there’s a mix of candid and shots I’ll direct my friends on where to go.”

 

Glaciers form by snow falling and not melting but building up over hundreds of years. As more snow falls it squishes the snow under it and eventually packs it down so forcefully that it forms ice.

Mediadrumimages / David Canales

 

Glacial ice is that beautiful glowing blue colour because the ice is so dense and hard that only the blue wavelength of light, the one with the most energy, can bounce off. All other wavelengths of light are absorbed by the glacier.

 

“The adventure is primary and the camera comes along,” added David.

Mediadrumimages / David Canales

 

“I’m just lucky enough to have such a photogenic environment. I can enjoy the glaciers and bring the camera out every now and then to snap a few photos. These glaciers are only a 45 minute drive from Anchorage which is Alaska’s largest city.

 

“Find your wilderness. It doesn’t have to be a 15 mile one-way bike ride to a glacier. Wilderness is more of a state of mind than it is a place. You can find wilderness in a park in the middle of a big city.”

Mediadrumimages / David Canales

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