Diego Moreno / mediadrumworld.com

By Rebecca Drew

EYE-OPENING images recreate the monsters that haunt Mexicans who follow their traditional beliefs.

 

Diego Moreno / mediadrumworld.com

The series of spectacular shots show large monsters dressed in flamboyant dresses and face masks watching television, at a birthday party and sitting in a workshop. One image even shows a monster dressed as a bride and one sitting on a bed underneath a crucifix.

 

Diego Moreno / mediadrumworld.com

The photographs are the work of Mexican photographer Diego Moreno (24). To take the pictures, Diego used a Nikon D90 camera.

“This project arises from a family anecdote and about my Aunt Abuela who suffered from scleroderma which is a disease that makes your organs cover with muscle and the skin thickens which holds fluid throughout the body,” said Diego.

 

Diego Moreno / mediadrumworld.com

“She always had to hide from visitors and did not exist in photo albums.

“I was fascinated by her and spent a lot of time at her side, she was very affectionate with me.

Diego Moreno / mediadrumworld.com

“In my pictures we can see the entrance to another realm, where the monsters can be part of the family and inhabit domestic space without provoking any reaction of discomfort.

“We can also see an intimate space full of symbolism and collective Mexican memory, like the saints of the Catholic religion.

 

Diego Moreno / mediadrumworld.com

“They are scenes loaded with a lot of psychological density, where the true narrative is given by the viewer.

“They provide a framework for understanding the human condition.

 

Diego Moreno / mediadrumworld.com

“Perhaps, I can reveal secret truths that are not visible in everyday life and reflect upon all misunderstood beings, creatures and marginal things.

“For me they are endearing and I identify with them deeply.

 

Diego Moreno / mediadrumworld.com

“The idea of a ‘monster’ should not be frightening, it must be beautiful, in fact, our world would surely be a little more magical if these figures lived among us.”

Diego made the costumes himself, using the resources he had available to him and says that this was time consuming at times.

 

Diego Moreno / mediadrumworld.com

“I built all of the characters that I photographed in this series, the clothing consists of many metres of cloth and Halloween masks,” he said.

“I learnt to create the costumes from what I had on hand, I had to postpone some of my shots because I hadn’t been able to make the costumes.

 

Diego Moreno / mediadrumworld.com

“It’s fascinating to see the interaction between people with my photographs because I accidently impinge on their own conscience. Sometimes there are rations of fear and others of nostalgia.”

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